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Philips recalls 99 000 LED lamps for shock hazard

Aug 22, 2013

LED-based 60W-equivalent EnduraLED and AmbientLED lamps are recalled due to a lead wire in the housing that can potentially cause electrical shock danger to users.

Philips Lighting and the Unites States Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) have instigated a recall for around 99,000 LED-based replacement lamps sold under the EnduraLED and AmbientLED brands. A limited number of the solid-state lighting (SSL) products have "a lead wire in the bulb's housing [that] can have an improper fitting, which can electrify the entire lamp and pose a shock hazard."

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Philips spokesperson said there were two incidents outside the US that prompted the lamp recall although there were no serious injuries involved. The A Philips spokesperson said there were two incidents outside the US that prompted the lamp recall although there were no serious injuries involved. The company researched the incidents, identified the root cause, and determined that two batches of lamps were involved.


The recalled lamps are 12W and 12.5W products that were designed as replacements for 60W incandescent lamps. The included products were remote-phosphor designs that have a three-segment optical lens that is orange in color in the off state.

The impacted products were manufactured in China. Philips has a product-recall website that guides owners specifically in determining whether lamps they own are impacted by the recall. The instructions identify the Universal Product Code (UPC), date code, and factory code for the impacted products.

Philips stated that owners of lamps in the recall should stop using the products immediately. Philips will replace the lamps for free. Owners can call Philips at 800-295-5147 or send an email to ledprincelamp@phiilips.com to register for a replacement product. Philips said it will deliver replacements in
about four weeks.

"Philips is in direct contact with its customers to help them identify the products involved and how they can be exchanged," said a spokesperson. "The company has taken these actions to ensure all of its products live up to its high standards and the expectations of its customers."

The impacted products were sold primarily between October 2012 and May 2013. The lamps were sold by retailers including The Home Depot, Amazon.com, and major electrical distributors.